Railways of Stoke-on-Trent - Potteries Loop Line
 

   

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  Introduction | Etruria to Hanley | Cobridge to Burslem | Tunstall
Pits Hill to Goldenhill | Kidsgrove

 

Potteries Loop Line - Kidsgrove


next: route of the loop line around Kidsgrove
previous: introduction - the demise of the loop line
 


Kidsgrove

Kidsgrove developed in the 18th century as coal mining developed in the area. It forms part of the Potteries Urban Area in North Staffordshire, along with Stoke-on-Trent and Newcastle-under-Lyme. 

The expansion of Kidsgrove as a town began when the Trent and Mersey canal was built between 1766 and 1777. James Brindley designed the 1 mile long Harecastle Tunnel that cut through coal seems underlying the village. John Gilbert, the land agent for the Duke of Bridgewater, realised the potential and set about acquiring land and mineral rights in the area.

 

Kidsgrove is served by Kidsgrove railway station which was opened by the North Staffordshire Railway on October 9, 1848 as known as Harecastle station.

There were two other stations on the now closed Loop Line namely Kidsgrove, opened November 15, 1875 and Kidsgrove Market Street Halt opened 1905.

The route of the Loop Line through Golden Hill to join the main line at Kidsgrove
The route of the Loop Line through Golden Hill to join the main line at Kidsgrove
map c.1902

The Goldenhill to Kidsgrove section of the loop line opened to passengers and goods on the 15th of November 1875

 

Twelve Row, Kidsgrove
Twelve Row, Kidsgrove

With the growth of the industry and its workforce, rows of cottages were built for the miners and their families with names like Stable Row, Odd Row, Forge Row and Twelve Row, which still exists just above the Town Hall.
 


Loop Line bridge over Heathcote Street, Kidsgrove

Tight fit for a PMT bus in the 1960's as it passes beneath the Heathcote Street bridge which carried the old Potteries Loop Line. The bridge was 9ft 6in above the road.

Old colliery offices on the corner of Liverpool Road and Heathcote Street, Kidsgrove
Old colliery offices on the corner of Liverpool Road and Heathcote Street, Kidsgrove

"colliery offices" etched in the upstairs window
"colliery offices" etched in the upstairs window

and in the pediments a "Green Man" face
and in the pediments a "Green Man" face




next: route of the loop line around Kidsgrove
previous: introduction - the demise of the loop line